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“The man turned, his jacket opened, plainly visible a .32 in a shoulder holster the message screamed out ‘I can walk around London tooled up without any worries. It was time to go home….’

Peddling along to the first pickup, Stanley stopped and looked at the list. Here he comes looking around he looked twitchy no smiles today. In he goes, a few minutes, head down off he goes, go to the third one, wait he will be a while yet, here he is eyes everywhere looking around, very nervous, this is different it is on today. Miss a couple pick him up again, yes most definitely let’s get back to his flat. Now round the back there’s a small alleyway doesn’t go anywhere put the bike here chain on to many thieves about. Gloves, gun out of the saddlebag into jacket pocket, silencer in the other. Walk round to the front hand through the letterbox, people do what they have grown up doing, step inside pull the key through close the door. Stand still listen all quiet, up the stairs check the kitchen, toilet, bedroom, living room, suitcase feels heavy, whats the time? not much preparation fit silencer and wait. Time is a funny thing, if you have two minutes before you die it goes in a flash, when you have an hour and a half to pass it seems to last forever. A scrabble downstairs, make sure the safety catch is off, sit still, footsteps running up the stairs the door opened a man burst in put the briefcase on the coffee table and reached for the suit case, Stanley pulled the hammer back and the man turned.

NO!!!

Phht…phht

Blood splattered the back wall as the body was thrown across the room wait, silence, pick up the briefcase walk out slowly downstairs, wait listen. Open door step outside pull door shut. Walk round the back there is the bike at least it hasn’t been stolen.

Stanley sat in a park shelter the briefcase beside him. Tuesday morning very quiet, he looked at his watch five minutes, not many people around.  He looked through the missing plank at the back of his shelter, there’s the man walking along the path towards the opposite shelter. He reached it looked at his watch and sat down inside.  Stanley opened the briefcase, assembled the rifle, scope, silencer he looked around all clear. He put the rifle through the opening the stock firmly against his shoulder.  Look through the scope line it up, cross hairs  he’s looking at his watch again, nice and gently, control the breathing steady keep still, the rifle jerked against his shoulder and the man slipped down on the seat.  Stanley started taking the gun apart, scope, silencer, barrel, breach, stock all put away, close the case push the clips in stand up, pick up the case and slowly walk out. Down the path out of the gate along the road, no taxis about better get a bus….”

Michael Douglas Bosc – Author

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Tranquility

DSCF4071

The above picture has nothing to do with my writing or translation of my books,  it is just a picture of somewhere I would love to be when the translating gets tough. Since the beginning of the year I have been busy translating my books into Spanish, not easy I can assure you. I have a professional translator package but bless its cotton socks it does not understand nor like London slang.  It therefore throws a wobbly and either ignores things – which is no problem – or completely changes everything.  Grrrrr!  But I have persevered with it and now have a few people who read the results and let me know where it does not make sense – and at first there was a fair bit of that.  Then its back to the machine notes in hand and off we go again.   It is at times like these that I am glad I have gone back to school to study Spanish plus my Professor gets a little light reading.

The Books

The first book I translated was An East-End BoyUn Nino de Final Este. This was where the translator first got upset and changed things around. As it was pointed out to me it had taken a woman’s name and in translation altered it, thus turning her into a rapist, hey ho.   So it was back to the beginning and start again.  This time carefully checking things like Mr and Mrs making sure they were correct. It was amazing, ‘Trans’ would leave them unchanged then later in the book change them into the Spanish.  So it was read, check then read check again. Ask one of my readers to check it over then back to the beginning again. However, after all this it was done and is now out on Kindle.

My latest book for translation is A Perilous Future – Un Futuro Peligroso.  This was not too difficult as like most things after the first time you begin to get the hang of it. ‘Trans’ still threw a wobbly now and then but I was ready for most of them.  It didn’t stop me from wishing from time to time I was in that picture though, especially late at night.  Gradually we have come to an agreement, ‘Trans’ does the job I installed him to do, then I go through and correct everything I can, which in the last book was not much before passing to a reader. We then make any corrections necessary and finally we have a book for publication.  By the time you read this Un Futuro Peligroso will be out on Kindle.

I have since learnt to treat this programme with patience and understanding much as you would a child learning to read.  All in the hope that my next book will go even better.

(c)  Michael Douglas Bosc

 

 

 

 

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Michael Bosc Slides in from Spain to Guest with Mike Angley

MA: Michael Bosc is living in Spain on a finca growing olives and almonds. He was born in London during the second world war when V1s and Land Mines were falling on the houses. He served nine years in the RAF and is married with two grown up children.

Learning to sail in his mid forties, he sailed across the channel on many occasions visiting the Normandy coast from Cherbourg to Fecamp where English Kings are buried. Michael has always had an interest in history and found it relaxing writing an adventure story set in the latter stages of the American War of Independence: A Soldiers Wind.

His second book, A Loving Son, echoes back to his earlier life just after the war and the East end criminals, with the gangs growing, the East End criminals were finding their feet, this was Stanley’s training ground…

Interesting life story, Michael, and welcome to my blog. How did you get into the world of writing?

MB: I am retired and had been thinking of writing for some time. However, until I moved to Spain I never had the time, with sailing and other activities. But when my father-in-law died and we went back to England, I picked up the Sunday Telegraph and in there was an article by a lady reviewer. She was saying how all the books she had reviewed although good, did not contain enough sex, it was a bit like waves crashing on the beach. It was not necessary to be explicit but we all like to read about sex, so being a normal health male I thought, why not?

MA: (Chuckling) I understand it was your personal interests that drew you to the specific ideas you had for a novel. Tell us about that.

MB: My interest is in Naval History, British or otherwise, so when I read that I thought, I could write something along those lines, after all I sailed for over 20 years. I mentioned this to my wife who said go for it, and A Soldiers Wind was born.

A year later my mother-in-law was seriously ill and whilst in England (again) I decided to write about Stanley Saunders, an East end boy growing up in London after WW2, whose mother was a prostitute who set up an escort agency. It tells of Stanley’s maturing and how whilst protecting his mother from the villains, he hones his skills as a killer, an assassin; thus A Loving Son was born.

MA: Did your personal life’s story influence your writing – any real-life East enders as characters?

MB: No, apart from the fact of my birth-date 21st October (Trafalgar Day) plus my love of history and reading naval books, no. Not even the gangs of East London were close contacts however at that time in history it was a well documented fact that bodies were dumped in the marshes or were propping up bridges.

MA: Tell us about your novels.

MB: A Loving Son was supposed to be the first novel out, but Authorhouse were reluctant to publish at first as Stanley and Gillian were under 18yrs. Unfortunately, the difference between the USA and England was around 2 years, but after re-writing a few bits Stanley was published. I think I am more in tune with A Loving Son because of its setting in the period of time I grew up in. There was an awful lot of bent police, gang killings, and general dodgy goings on.

For a woman to set up a business in that atmosphere at that time was very bold. If the police were not wanting a cut to turn a blind eye to what was going on then the gangs wanted protection money so she could continue. Diane, although a prostitute, was a loving mother very fond of her only son and very protective towards him. She had her head on right and saved money to buy a house so they had somewhere to live. There is a lot more to her than you first see.

I took the memories of how hard it was in London immediately after the war, with rationing, food shortages etc., and then put Stanley in the role of protector of his mother. Strange as it may seem, once I had done that and given him a name, Stanley appeared and started to tell his story; once begun it just went from logical reactions to logical actions. What I did learn was that to Stanley there was no grey area, only black and white.

MA: Tell us more about Stanley’s character.
MB: He is honest in his way, does not think about when he kills, looks at it as a job pure and simple. But he does care about his mother and the girls. He is fond of them and looks after them like his family. However after a kill he needs sex…

MA: Oh my! Are you planning more stories in the future?

MB: I have the sequels to both books ready to go to print, and I am working on the next ones. Plus I am putting together a wine book with a difference. I write blogs on the local ‘Cellers’ here and the superb wines they produce, but I also add their history to the story. I am not a wine snob, I say what we like and don’t like but then most people can do that. I try to say something about the people, the village or the countryside. There is so much more than opening a bottle, tasting and writing. These blogs can also be found on Southwest Wines site, where they have been kind enough to give me my own page.

MA: Thanks, Michael. I appreciate you stopping by and visiting with me. I know my readers will want to learn more about you, too. Please visit Michael’s blog for more information: https://asoldierswind.wordpress.com/

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 If Stanley were real he would now be in his 80’s, and probably unhappy about not being able to `work’. So when he came to ask why I have not finished telling his story, I had to admit that although the last book has been started people did not seem interested in his story, as it did not contain werewolves, vampires, ghosts, etc., or modern technology and police work;  just sex, gangs, murder and mayhem, in other words good old-fashioned crime.  All the things that were actually happening in London after WW2. The things people did to survive and make money. 

It was not all Mills and Bloom, it was more rackets, murder, gangs and bent coppers (police).  West-end Central was the most notorious police station going. Coppers on the make and take, turning and looking the other way unless things got too bad then grabbing someone to show they were doing something.  There was the odd government agency operating, nothing like Jame Bond, more like removal men, assisting others or their own governments when needed. Well-trained and ruthless killers, assassins if you prefer, but killers all the same.  As Stanley said it was a job, it had to be done and he was paid well, and governments interfering in other countries is no newer than back scratching.  I had to agree with this statement.

Anyway I digress. Stanley is somewhat at a loss as to why the story of a boy’s love for his mum and his protection of her does not appeal, after all it is normal, isn’t it? As for the Escort Agency nothing wrong there and the girls were beautiful, healthy and well looked after.  His reputation saw to that.

So I have told Stanley that the second book is being proofread, and I will be back with him and the others soon.   He did agree about one thing though, Russell is the right choice.

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